Request a Callback

Ready to Talk About Addiction Treatment Options? Call 866-493-0802 Now!

Discover the RIGHT TREATMENT to STOP YOUR ADDICTION

We're all unique. We'll help you pick the best addiction treatment program for you.

This article will describe the difference between social drinkers and alcoholics. Alcohol’s intoxicating effects have been manipulated in ceremonies and used for celebration for centuries.  Although it has been made illegal for short periods due its addiction and addictive qualities, it has always been available, since the process of making it is quite simple and the knowledge can be readily obtained.

Through the centuries, alcohol has become an object of romanticism.  From Bible excerpts to Shakespearean literature, it has been alluded to as a fundamental part of life.  It was treated almost as an art form; one that has been embraced by both the rich and the poor.  It is universal.  Even the most remote tribes have been found to ferment certain berries and other fruits.

About Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol is an integral part of the economy and a lot of money is spent on its marketability.  It covers the pages of popular magazines; it is plastered across our country on signs and billboards;  it is used in television and in movies by Social Drinkers and Alcoholicsactors, and this has a strong influence on the young.  It is portrayed as being the ultimate relaxant. In the last few years, alcohol has become rampant on television shows at all times of day and night.  Actors drink at dinner, on dates, at social functions and leave stressful jobs to hang out with friends at serving establishments.  It is shown quite often as being a stress reliever. It seems that whenever one of the characters has a bad day, they are shown with a beer, glass of wine or cocktail in hand.  If an occasion arises in the script of horrible circumstance, the actor is often seen as overly intoxicated. Addiction to alcohol, alcoholism and alcoholics have been glamorized by society.

For many reasons, this is a negative portrayal.  It gives the impression to our youth that when confronted with stressful areas of life, drinking alcohol to escape is a normal and healthy reaction.  Justifying alcohol abuse is dangerous and foolish.  It is when the lines of acceptable behavior become indistinct that the difference between social drinkers and alcoholics are confused.

Alcoholics exhibit learned behavior.  Situations that begin with moderation can easily turn to abuse.  If one is constantly surrounded by the presence of alcohol, it is likely they will begin to misuse it.  Like any other substance that is addictive, alcohol should only be used occasionally and in moderation to avoid the building of a tolerance.  The amount and frequency are key in the determination of an addiction.  Habitual drinking is the first stage for alcoholics and the beginning of an addiction cycle.  There are certain types of personalities that should stay away from alcohol altogether, as they are not mentally healthy enough to deal with its addictive properties.  Those who suffer from depression or other abnormalities are more likely to become alcoholics as they lack the strength to deny the craving.

Alcohol is dangerous and should not be tampered with.  Despite the media’s lighthearted portrayal, the line between social drinkers and alcoholics is very fine; and with constant abuse, can be easily crossed.  Once this occurs it is not as easy to return to the previous state, as addiction can be quite powerful and hard to be rid of. Recovery from long-term and chronic alcohol abuse is best accomplished in a drug rehab facility, the percentages of sustained recovery are much higher.

More Information On Social Drinkers and Alcoholics

If you or someone you love has an alcohol addiction and you’re seeking help, contact us immediately and ask for more information on the difference between social drinkers and alcoholics.

Don’t delay another second
when help is so close.

Call 866-493-0802 Now!

For Treatment Help Call:

866-493-0802

For Immediate Treatment Help Call:
866-493-0802